Hierarchy of needs and behaviorist theories

Motivational salience Motivation as a desire to perform an action is usually defined as having two parts, directional such as directed towards a positive stimulus or away from a negative one, as well as the activated "seeking phase" and consummatory "liking phase". This type of motivation has neurobiological roots in the basal gangliaand mesolimbic, dopaminergic pathways. Activated "seeking" behavior, such as locomotor activity, is influenced by dopaminergic drugs, and microdialysis experiments reveal that dopamine is released during the anticipation of a reward.

Hierarchy of needs and behaviorist theories

Helder Almeida The term motivation is derived from the Latin word movere, meaning "to move. Motivation theory is thus concerned with the processes that explain why and how human behavior is activated. The broad rubric of motivation and motivation theory is one of the most frequently studied and written-about topics in the organizational sciences, and is considered one of the most important areas of study in the field of organizational behavior.

Despite the magnitude of the effort that has been devoted to the study of motivation, there is no single theory of motivation that is universally accepted. The lack of a unified theory of motivation reflects both the complexity of the construct and the diverse backgrounds and aims of those who study it.

To delineate these crucial points, it is illuminating to consider the development of motivation and motivation theory as the objects of scientific inquiry. Psychologists writing in the late 19th and early twentieth centuries suggested that human beings were basically programmed to behave in certain ways, depending upon the behavioral cues to which they were exposed.

Sigmund Freud, for example, argued that the most powerful determinants of individual behavior were those of which Hierarchy of needs and behaviorist theories individual was not consciously aware.

Abraham Maslow - Wikipedia

According to Motivation and Leadership at Work Steers, Porter, and Bigley,in the early twentieth century researchers began to examine other possible explanations for differences in individual motivation.

Some researchers focused on internal drives as an explanation for motivated behavior. Others studied the effect of learning and how individuals base current behavior on the consequences of past behavior. Still others examined the influence of individuals' cognitive processes, such as the beliefs they have about future events.

Over time, these major theoretical streams of research in motivation were classified into two major schools: In general, such theories regard motivation as the product of internal drives that compel an individual to act or move hence, "motivate" toward the satisfaction of individual needs.

The content theories of motivation are based in large part on early theories of motivation that traced the paths of action backward to their perceived origin in internal drives.

Major content theories of motivation are Maslow's hierarchy of needs, Alderfer's ERG theory, Herzberg's motivator-hygiene theory, and McClelland's learned needs or three-needs theory. Abraham Maslow developed the hierarchy of needs, which suggests that individual needs exist in a hierarchy consisting of physiological needs, security needs, belongingness needs, esteem needs, and self-actualization needs.

Physiological needs are the most basic needs for food, water, and other factors necessary for survival.

Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs - Learning Theories

Security needs include needs for safety in one's physical environment, stability, and freedom from emotional distress. Belongingness needs relate to desires for friendship, love, and acceptance within a given community of individuals.

Esteem needs are those associated with obtaining the respect of one's self and others. Finally, self-actualization needs are those corresponding to the achievement one's own potential, the exercising and testing of one's creative capacities, and, in general, to becoming the best person one can possibly be.

Unsatisfied needs motivate behavior; thus, lower-level needs such as the physiological and security needs must be met before upper-level needs such as belongingness, esteem, and self-actualization can be motivational.

Applications of the hierarchy of needs to management and the workplace are obvious. According to the implications of the hierarchy, individuals must have their lower level needs met by, for example, safe working conditions, adequate pay to take care of one's self and one's family, and job security before they will be motivated by increased job responsibilities, status, and challenging work assignments.

Despite the ease of application of this theory to a work setting, this theory has received little research support and therefore is not very useful in practice. The ERG theory is an extension of Maslow's hierarchy of needs. Alderfer suggested that needs could be classified into three categories, rather than five.

These three types of needs are existence, relatedness, and growth. Existence needs are similar to Maslow's physiological and safety need categories.

Relatedness needs involve interpersonal relationships and are comparable to aspects of Maslow's belongingness and esteem needs. Growth needs are those related to the attainment of one's potential and are associated with Maslow's esteem and self-actualization needs.

The ERG theory differs from the hierarchy of needs in that it does not suggest that lower-level needs must be completely satisfied before upper-level needs become motivational.

ERG theory also suggests that if an individual is continually unable to meet upper-level needs that the person will regress and lower-level needs become the major determinants of their motivation. ERG theory's implications for managers are similar to those for the needs hierarchy: Frederick Herzberg developed the motivator-hygiene theory.

This theory is closely related to Maslow's hierarchy of needs but relates more specifically to how individuals are motivated in the workplace. Based on his research, Herzberg argued that meeting the lower-level needs hygiene factors of individuals would not motivate them to exert effort, but would only prevent them from being dissatisfied.

Only if higher-level needs motivators were met would individuals be motivated. The implication for managers of the motivator-hygiene theory is that meeting employees lower-level needs by improving pay, benefits, safety, and other job-contextual factors will prevent employees from becoming actively dissatisfied but will not motivate them to exert additional effort toward better performance.

To motivate workers, according to the theory, managers must focus on changing the intrinsic nature and content of jobs themselves by "enriching" them to increase employees' autonomy and their opportunities to take on additional responsibility, gain recognition, and develop their skills and careers.

McClelland's theory suggests that individuals learn needs from their culture. Three of the primary needs in this theory are the need for affiliation n Affthe need for power n Powand the need for achievement n Ach.

The need for affiliation is a desire to establish social relationships with others. The need for power reflects a desire to control one's environment and influence others.considered as the directional influencing of behavior by nonstimulus, or internal, variables.

Hierarchy of needs and behaviorist theories

These variables are usually called drives or needs. Need Theories: Comparing Maslow, Alderfer, and McClelland Most theories of motivation revolve around the idea an employee’s needs influence their motivation. Needs are physiological or psychological scarcities that stimulate behavior therefore are necessary to live a healthy, productive lives both in personal and work lives.

What are Maslow's hierarchy of needs? print Print; behaviorist theory, or both. Maslow rejected these early theories as insufficient to account for the human dimensions of motivation. He. Bloom’s Taxonomy (Bloom) 3 years ago • Free Access • 3 Bloom’s Taxonomy is a model that is a hierarchy — a way to classify thinking according to six cognitive levels of complexity.

Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs (often represented as a pyramid with five levels of needs) is a motivational theory in psychology that argues that while people aim to meet basic needs, they seek to meet successively higher needs in the form of a pyramid.

Maslow's hierarchy of needs is a motivational theory in psychology comprising a five-tier model of human needs, often depicted as hierarchical levels within a pyramid.

Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs | Simply Psychology