An analysis of the white cube by christoph grunenberg

You can see a photograph of the color change within the MOMA blog post. Any opinions on the color choice? Do you think that there are new associations brought about by the changes to wall color?

An analysis of the white cube by christoph grunenberg

Vitrine Object Retail application Vitrine manifests itself in two ways in retail applications: Object Vitrine is a traditional, museum-style glass showcase that is used in retail interiors for displaying small and medium-sized products.

The simple act of placing an object in a Vitrine makes it seem important and precious. In natural history and anthropological museums, vitrines are used to protect and preserve significant artifacts, as well as to frame everyday objects from another time or place in order to provoke consideration for the meaningful stories the objects have to tell.

Retailers similarly use Vitrines both for securely displaying high-ticket items and displaying less expensive items in a manner that creates the illusion of importance. Although multiple objects may be displayed together in the same vitrine, there is a functional difference in the retail setting between a Vitrine that "museumizes" the contained objects and glass display cases used primarily for security purposes.

Vitrines were used in science and medicine to preserve specimens in such a way that would maintain their appearance for An analysis of the white cube by christoph grunenberg and study. Vitrines entered the retail arena around the beginning of the 18th century, with glass display cases used by goldsmiths and tobacconists.

Goldsmiths utilized some fairly sophisticated glass display fixtures that were early forms of Vitrine. They often had what were referred to as "presses," which were full-height, glass-fronted cupboards that usually spanned the length of the wall behind the sales counter and became the focal point for customers in the store.

Shopkeepers clearly considered the presentation of their goods, with velvet-lined, glass-topped cabinets being another popular display fixture among goldsmiths.

An analysis of the white cube by christoph grunenberg

Historian Claire Walsh noted that "the amount of this very expensive material [glass] on view in the shop would have been impressive Particularly in the case of goldsmiths the expensive nature of the fittings was a crucial expression of the financial standing of the shopkeeper, convincing the customer of his ability to provide expensive items.

These display cases did not have panels of glass on multiple sides as would become a defining characteristic for later iterations of Vitrine, but these early applications of glass as a material for retail display are undoubtedly important. The Pitt Rivers Museum, an ethnological and anthropological museum founded in Oxford, England inis known for its iconic use of the multi-faceted glass Vitrine rather than the glass-fronted or glass-topped displays found earlier.

The main gallery in the museum consisted of a tightly-packed arrangement of Vitrines, containing various collections of objects. The museum was founded by and named after Lieutenant-General Augustus Henry Lane Fox Pitt Rivers after his growing collection of firearms, weapons and other material culture objects outgrew his home.

To demonstrate this evolutionary process, objects were often grouped together in the Vitrines rather than being displayed individually. A comparison can be made here between the types of applications of vitrines in museum versus retail environments.

Vitrine becomes an important framing and organizational element for museum displays, or for grouping related objects together as in the case of the Pitt Rivers Museum.

Museums employ a combination of table-height vitrines for arranging taxonomies or other collections with other glass showcases for either highlighting single or grouping several precious objects, depending on the sizes, types or collections of objects.

These different applications of Vitrine directly translate to the retail environment, informing its use and effects. Sometimes retail Vitrines draw upon taxonomy as an organizational method, especially with smaller-scale products like jewelry.

Many of these types of display cases contain larger quantities of product, and serve the practical purposes of security and protection for expensive merchandise in addition ton presenting it as art. These Vitrines are accessed by salespeople to show products to customers, others that are intended for single or few objects usually are not.

These types of Vitrines isolate single products or group several together purely for display. The relationship between art and consumer products has been a long-running literary theme and is particularly relevant to the discussion of Vitrine. Her discussion addresses one of the key effects of placing objects within Vitrines: The vitrine reinforces the notion of the unique, untouchable and unattainable By rendering untouchable the contained object or work of art, the more important and precious it becomes.

The ability to look but not touch has even more extreme psychological implications in the retail setting than in a museum, given the consumerism and materialism associated with shopping.

Sensitivity to the power and necessity of curated presentation were apparent in late 19th century literature. In commenting on the Berlin Trade Fair inphilosopher Georg Simmel referred to the "shop-window quality of things," noting that the aesthetics and presentation of the objects on display were almost becoming more important than the function and intrinsic value of the objects.

Consideration for product display has since remained in the discourse, more recently becoming a topic in the art world.

An analysis of the white cube by christoph grunenberg

Although there had been a dialogue about the relationship between art and consumer goods since the late 19th century, several artists in the later half of the 20th century directly addressed the themes of consumerism and Vitrines in their works.

The combination in the early s of the increasing popularity of boutiques as a new retail typology and Pop Art as the avant garde art movement contributed to alternative perspectives towards Vitrine.

Targeted towards younger generations, boutiques made fashion more accessible and used the interior design of their shops as one of the primary means of doing so.

Display techniques were informal, with hand-selected clothing and accessories often casually hung or draped over furniture pieces. Kate Spade reflected on the boutique philosophy: In the s, Jeff Koons made visible the connection between the banal object and Vitrine.

The vacuums were mass-produced, common products displayed as if precious artifacts, much as many products are presented on the market today: The cocoon in which they find themselves, is on the one hand a display window and on the other a shield, an enveloping aura, which should protect out-dated models from ageing quickly, giving them eternal newness, security and relevance.

In more recent years, British artist Damien Hirst created works that continued to challenge the notion of the Vitrine. Hirst featured various animals preserved and suspended in formaldehyde in a series of Vitrine-based works, including the infamous shark in The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living - In practice the “white cube” (the white-walled gallery display prevalent in galleries of modern art) renders viewer unaware of the influence that it inflicts upon his/hers perception of what consist a modern art.

In practice the “white cube” (the white-walled gallery display prevalent in galleries of modern art) renders viewer unaware of the influence that it inflicts upon his/hers perception of what consist a modern art.

- In practice the “white cube” (the white-walled gallery display prevalent in galleries of modern art) renders viewer unaware of the influence that it inflicts upon his/hers perception of what consist a modern art. MOMA Breaking from the White Cube.

as to why modern museums like the Hirschorn use white walls. When I was in graduate school, we analyzed a case study by Christoph Grunenberg called "The Modern Art Museum." Grunenberg discusses how the "white cube" setting (i.e.

MOMA Breaking from the White Cube

paintings in a square room with white walls) is a standard in modern art. Vitrine | Object | Retail application. Vitrine manifests itself in two ways in retail applications: the Object Vitrine and the Store Vitrine. Object Vitrine is a traditional, museum-style glass showcase that is used in retail interiors for displaying small and medium-sized products.

The work of the post-medium condition—conceptual art, installation, and relational aesthetics—advances the idea that the “white cube” of the museum or gallery wall is over.

Krauss argues that the technical support extends the life of the white cube, restoring autonomy and specificity to the work of art.

MOMA Breaking from the White Cube | Alberti’s Window